Tag Archives: Education

Markets, Efficiency, and Price Signals: Crash Course Economics #19

Adriene and Jacob teach you all about markets. So, in free market(ish) economies like the United States and most of the world, markets are a big deal. Markets work to produce the stuff that consumers want, and that society needs. Today we’ll talk about productive and allocative efficiency, skinny jeans, price signals, and more in this information-dense installment of Crash Course.

Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse

Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever:

Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
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Introduction to inflation | Inflation – measuring the cost of living | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy

Basics of price inflation and the CPI (consumer price index)

Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics…

Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics…

Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course

About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We’ve also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content.

For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything

Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCByt…
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Behavioral Economics: Crash Course Econ 27

Why do people buy the stuff they buy? In classical economics, most models assume that consumers behave rationally. As you’ve probably noticed in your real life, in case after case, people don’t actually make rational decisions. There can be emotional or social reasons for all this irrationality, and behavioral economics tries to address this. We’ll talk about risk, nudge theory, prices and perception, and the ultimatum game. So, let’s get irrational, in a logical way, of course.

Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse

Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever:

Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks

Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet?
Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC…
Twitter – http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
Tumblr – http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com
Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse

CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids

YouTube Channel: CrashCourse

What startup communities can learn from the Black Wall Street | Anthony Frasier | TEDxBarnardCollege

What do Silicon Valley and Tulsa, Oklahoma have in common? More than you could ever imagine. Over the past one hundred years both have been home to entrepreneurial multi-millionaires. And though comparatively fewer have heard about The Greenwood District in Tulsa, otherwise known as “Black Wall Street;” Anthony Frasier showcases how the fabric of this once vibrant ecosystem laid the groundwork for innovation and growth all over the United States. Inspired by his predecessors in Oklahoma, Frasier’s TEDx weaves a story of a determined entrepreneur from Tulsa to Newark, who would eventually co-found The Phat Startup and breathe new life into a U.S. community.

“Anthony Frasier is the co-Founder of The Phat Startup, a media company that produces resources for entrepreneurs.
His work has been featured on CNN Money, Forbes, Black Enterprise, and Black In America. Frasier was also named an innovator by AT&T which led to a spot that aired to millions weekly and was praised by The Washington Post. A serial entrepreneur, Frasier founded the startup Playd and award-winning gaming site, The Koalition. Frasier is actively involved in Newark, NJ, helping aspiring entrepreneurs. His initiatives have been recognized by the Business Outreach Center and he was granted the Award for Community Impact in 2012.”

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

What you need to know about advertisement impression?

What you need to know about advertisement impression?

By Patrick Hill @HGDMarketing

 

 

 

Advertising on social platforms and apps are the way to go for businesses. The problem you may have is understanding the operation of advertising on these platforms. When you first sign up for advertisement on both platforms, you must know advertisement languages, and it’s functions. The trick is to gather data to broaden your knowledge of advertisement. So, when you are applying information for ads of your business, you may need to know these things before you proceed to place an ad over the platform.

 

Impression is self-explanatory. You know what it means personally so it really doesn’t need much explanation. I am going to keep it simple. Impression is an idea, feeling, or opinion about something or someone, especially one formed without conscious thought or on the basis of little evidence. This is the dictionary term of impression. When it comes to advertisement term, impression is an ad that is fetched from its source. For instance, you place an ad for a hair growth product through twitter ads. The ad goes all over twitter based on the information you apply. Impressions are not clicks or sales remember that. Impressions is a counter. Basically, it counts how many users saw the ad without clicking on the ad.

 

You will also notice the impression estimate rate once you have completed the first set of information when you are setting up your campaign.  Remember that impression is as important as when you go out for a date, event, and interview. You want to make a good impression to the users in order for your ad to get conversions.

 

 

 

Next up conversions.

How to Use Social Media to Promote Your Business and Drive Traffic to Your Website

 In this video Sean Cannell from THiNK media TV talks about using social media for marketing, how to drive traffic to your website using youtube, and tips for growing your photography business. If you are interested in using social media for business and driving more traffic to your website, check out this video!

Hands on Skills: How to use Twitter for your business.

Hands on Skills: How to use Twitter for your business.

 

Social media has over a billion users that are currently active on the platform. People from all over the globe use social media to connect or reconnect with individuals. Professionals use social media to advertise and network with other professionals. Therefore, professionals use social media to engage with their audience, and other professionals. Even so, it is highly recommended for those professionals to reach audiences for business interaction. Businesses rely on social media to interact as well as marketing. When it comes to social media for businesses, it is highly a priority to engage with your audience. So, how to use Twitter for your business?

 

Twitter is an interesting platform with 140 characters and hashtags. It is where most people just engage in hashtags to be a part of the conversation. Now, I want you to consider the next steps as an assignment for you to acknowledge the do’s & don’ts when setting up a business page on Twitter.

 

The ten do’s.

  1. Interaction
  2. Campaign
  3. Promoting
  4. Advertising
  5. Updates
  6. Products
  7. Services
  8. Events
  9. PR
  10. Showcase

 

The Ten don’ts.

  1. Personal usages
  2. Profanity
  3. Harassing
  4. Bullying
  5. Political
  6. Soliciting
  7. Spam
  8. Discrimination
  9. Hate Speech
  10. Scam

 

The way you use twitter for your business is by being more aware and conscience of your business practices. Know what your 140 character words will be and how you going to reach your audience. The best way to get results for your business is by using hashtags to get impressions which are like views in a way. The higher your impressions are, the more conversions you will get for your business. Conversions are when people click on what you advertise or say on twitter. It is difficult for a business to get sells digitally. However, if you grasp it, you may get results that can be sells. Here is what I want you to do as of developing hands on skills on Twitter.

 

  • Set up a Twitter page for your business
  • Add contacts
  • Make sure your page is set from logo to website link
  • Type 4 to 6 messages using hashtags from trending topics
  • 140 words has to be about brand awareness which is soft selling your brand
  • Explain your business through two messages
  • Present a product or service through two messages
  • Leave a link in one message
  • Use a picture or video of your product or service in one message
  • Interact with curious consumers.
  • Be transparent and confident in your pitch
  • Sell your brand mission and vision to the consumers
  • Repeat each of these steps again each week or month.

 

You will see results within these steps. However, there is no guarantee on getting sells. It depends on your pitch and product. Have to find a way to persuade your audience into buying your product or service.

 

 

Good luck and keep practicing

 

 

 

Think Fast, Talk Smart: Communication Techniques

 

Communication is critical to success in business and life. Concerned about an upcoming interview? Anxious about being asked to give your thoughts during a meeting? Fearful about needing to provide critical feedback in the moment? You are not alone! Learn and practice techniques

Stanford Graduate School of Business